The Differences Between the Brazilian and the European Portuguese

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Whenever I talk to someone who wants to learn Portuguese, this person comes up with a bunch of questions: what's the difference between the BP (Brazilian Portuguese) and the EP (European Portuguese)? Which one is better? The only thing that he/she forgets is that I am brazilian! I'm very biased to give my opinion on this matter, ain't I?! Since I've always wanted to clear that up, I'll try to stay as much impartial as I can while writing this post. I do not want to take any sides on this, trust me. Don't worry!

First of all: there's no better! It all depends on your needs. Why would you learn the BP if you're going to Portugal or vice-versa? That doesn't make any sense at all! Just think about it: if in a single country there are lots and lots of regional differences regarding the language, the differences from a country to another should be astronomical - even if they have the "same" language. Now, we can't say that there aren't any similarities, because we'd be taking extremist positions. What I want you to know is that yeah, the BP and the EP are very different from each other. 

Ok, Aryel, ok! I know that they're different, cut the crap! I would have not asked that question if I didn't know that. What's exactly the difference between them? 

Oh, God! All right, let's figure that out!

1 - The Accent

The "*two" accents are completely different! Seriously, they have absolutely NOTHING to do with each other! It's not that hard to know when the person who's speaking has a BP or a EP accent. The BP accent sounds more clear (at least to my ears hahaha) while the EP sounds more like French/Spanish, I don't know. They (the Portuguese) tend to extend the "s" (like "sh") and their "r" (if I'm not mistaken) slightly sounds like it is made with the throat. The EP speakers speak a bit more faster. Due to these and several other differences, sometimes they have a hard time understanding each other. Since EP is the "mother" of our language, I don't know if they have the same issues there, but over here we have to put subtitles (most times) to understand what they're saying while watching something on the TV or on the internet. 

** There are many accents in Brazil. 

2 - The Spelling/Grammar

You might've heard that the Portuguese speaking countries reached an Orthographic Agreement. That's true, but don't take it too seriously.  As I said before, each country has its own characteristics. How do they ever hope us to change our language after years of tradition? It at least sounds like an offense to me and to most of the Brazilians that I know. I'm sure the Portuguese must feel the same way. Though we are now forced to write by following the new rules (at school, universities, etc), you can be sure that we haven't changed our way of speaking - not even a little bit. The same goes for them, which is perfectly acceptable. The structure of our sentences remain the same in "real" life.  If you really want to go for the basics, you should know that Brazilians normally place the object pronoun before the verb. Most of the time, it'd be considered incorrect in the EP, in which the pronoun is generally placed after the verb. Ex.:

-> She greeted me

Brazil: Ela me cumprimentou
Portugal: Ela cumprimentou-me

3 - Vocabulary

Now you have to be very careful! Those two dialects have simple, but dangerous words that can be completely misunderstood depending on where you are. For instance, in English we have the word "line". There are different meanings for it, but I'll take the traditional one (like a line in a bank). How do we say that in Portuguese? Well, if you're in Brazil you'll have to say fila. If you're in Portugal, you'll have to say bicha. Here's the danger! The meaning of bicha in Brazil is far from line. What in Portugal is a simple word for this term, in Brazil is a slang for gay. Once there was a Portuguese student in my class who got really embarrassed on his first day because of this. He didn't know what it meant here and well... There's no need to say what happened. There are many other words and sentences that will trick you like that. I'll list a few of them:

-> To get a shot (needles) on the butt

Brazil: tomar uma vacina na bunda
Portugal: levar uma pica no rabo

If you say that you tomou uma pica no rabo in Brazil, people will automatically think that you had sex, that is, that you had a dick in your ass. I'm sorry for the usage of such words. I just want to make it as much clear as possible. 

-> Panties

Brazil: calcinha
Portugal: cueca

Cueca in Brazil means underpants (for men). If you're a girl, don't ever say that you're wearing a cueca, because it won't come over too well. 

-> Tax

Brazil: imposto
Portugal: propina

Propina in Brazil means bribe. If you hear that a cop got propina from someone, it means that he/she was bought off. 

I found this picture in one of my old notebooks. Take a look:

Book: Pílulas de Sabedoria Instantânea da Professora Etelvina
Author: Gehringer, Max;
Publishing House: Globo Editora


4 - Slang

Brazilians tend to use much more slang than the Portuguese people. You've probably heard that Brazilians are friendly and free-spirited people. Guess what? That's totally true! We don't use slang because we don't know how to use the formal speech (some people really don't, but I guess it's the same everywhere), but do you want to know what? It sucks over here! No frills! When we're talking, we try to be polite and get closer to the other person. We like to make them feel comfortable. You should know that 80% of times we avoid hard words and formalities. We only take this way if we really have to (in a meeting, during a presentation or whatever). But hey! I'm not saying that the Portuguese people are arrogant or anything. They just like to keep their language as it is. 

Well, those are the major differences. As you can see, there are much more differences between the BP and the EP than between the AE and the BE. However, don't ever let the obstacles put you off. Think properly and see which one meets your needs.  I particularly wouldn't say that they're the same language anymore, but... Officially they are! 

If I were to visit Portugal, I'm not sure if I'd use my Brazilian accent there. I'd probably speak English... Why? Well, I don't like to jump to conclusions or to go for misconceptions, but I've been told that they don't like it that much. Since I've never been there, I can't assume that this is true or not. But I'm the kind of person who likes to cover all the bases. I guess I wouldn't like someone looking down on me for my dialect. We should never change our language for the others, but we should treat them with respect. If they don't like it... Anyway! Don't worry if you learn the EP... We'd still understand you (with your help, of course), but it wouldn't be a big problem. We like the differences... After all, that's what makes us unique, isn't it? :)

Did I forget anything? Have you ever had a hard time understanding one of these dialects? Tell me in a comment below! 

Have a nice weekend! :)

15 comments:

  1. I guess some portuguese guy has been messing with you :)
    "tomar uma pica no rabo" is not something you say in EP, starting with the verb. We only use "tomar" when we talk about taking medicine or having a drink. Also, "pica" is only an explanatory word we use for kids, no grown man in his right mind uses that expression :)
    Correctly, it would be: "levar uma vacina no rabo".
    Regarding the term "propinas", we use that word for the amount of money we pay for school. In Portugal, imposto means the same: imposto/ tax.
    The picture on your notebook is full of errors as well, you should check your sources ;)
    But to answer the general topic of the post, it's all Portuguese and the differences are not so big that you need help to understand one another. In Portugal, different cities have different words for the same things and everyone understands each other.

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    1. Thanks for your feedback, Constança! It's good to have someone to help me clear that up.

      Well, I'm sorry for the mistakes in your language. Since I'm not from there, I'll never sound like a Portuguese. What I did was to try to show the people the differences that surround our languages. My intention was never to have a perfect EP, because I'm happy with my own.

      Regarding my sources, I really appreciate your tip. As you can see, I based what I wrote on what I learned in school and on a few popular books that can be found over here. I've never been there, and as my great grandparents are already dead (they were Portuguese), there was no one to warn me about such mistakes. I'd never figure that out. You have an important role here! That's what we need! We need to get rid of the misconceptions once and for all, and we'll never be able to do that if we're alone.

      However, I disagree about the accents. Maybe you don't have a hard time understanding us because your language is the "mother" of ours. I've seen some Portuguese people who think that we Brazilians try to mess with them (some really do, but they're worthless for this topic), but that's not our point. It IS hard to understand you sometimes, and that's why some people like me prefer to forget this language when we're going to talk to you. It's easier, and it won't bring up any problems at all.

      Once again, thanks for your help! :)

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  2. Hi Aryel!

    Well, first of all, let me tell you that I am Portuguese (born in Lisbon), I teach Portuguese (and English by the way), and I am quiete familar with Brazilan Portuguese. I do not usually post things on blogs, but there are so many misconceptions pervading this text of yours, that I just couldn't help commenting on it.
    Firstly, I have absolutely no idea where you got that "knowledge" about European Portuguese from, but let me tell you that you really need to learn a bit more about it, in the case you want your opinion to be taken seriously, of course. Most of your statements are based on wrong ideas and lack of knowledge, really, so they can actually make non-Portuguese speakers have a totally erroneous idea about the theme. I'll just comment some of the topics you addressed here:

    1. First Thing: European Portuguese is not a dialetc. I could elaborate on this, but it would be lengthy...

    2. The BP nad EP accents, as you call them, are not completely different. There are differences, of course, but using "completely" here is a bit too much...

    3. When you say EP sounds more like Spanish or French, you're just showing a total lack of knowledge of YOUR own language.

    4. Do we, in Portugal, "extend" the "s"?! We do, sometimes, depending on the location of the letter in the word, and also on national language variations. It is not a general rule.

    5. The "r" made with the throat?! See above comment. Don't some Brazilians do the same, by the way? They do. I have heard it.

    6. We do not have a hard time understanding each other. I have no clue where you got that idea from.

    7. Some words and expressions apart, because yes, there are indeed differences, we perfectly understand BP. We do not need subtitles at all! Again, you need to know YOUR own language better, because WE understand YOU very well.

    8. Now the "bicha" issue. Well, we, in Portugal, say either bicha or fila for "line". However, we tend to avoid "bicha" precisely because of its double meaning. Here, too, bicha is slang for gay.

    9. I would never as a Portuguese from Portugal say "tomar uma pica no rabo". Ever. I doubt any Portuguese would. Again, where did you get that idea from?! First, the word "pica" in this context is the kind of vocabulary we use to talk to small children. We would say "pica" instead of "vacina" just because it is a simpler word. However, we would not use the verb "tomar" neither with "pica", nor with "vacina", but "levar" instead. I would say the average normal Portuguese would then say "levar uma vacina" and would not even specify where...

    You are also probably wrong when you say that there are more differences between the BP and the EP than between the AE nad the BE. I use the word probably here because I never conducted research on this, so I cannot really be 100% sure. I don't usually make statement based on nothing...

    What language is it that you speak then, if you think we, in Portugal, and you, in Brazil, do not speak the same language anymore?!

    Don't get me wrong. I have nothing against you. I just think people need to know what they are talking about, and you do not. That is for sure!

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    1. Hey, Carla! Thanks for you comment!

      Ok, if you really want to get into it, let's do it!

      -> [...] I have absolutely no idea where you got that "knowledge" about European Portuguese from [...]

      -> [...] Most of your statements are based on wrong ideas and lack of knowledge [...]

      If you're really quite familiar with the BP as you say, you probably know that we are taught this way. If my statements are "based on wrong ideas and lack of knowledge", be aware that they don't come from me, but from those who spread it out. While writing a post, I try to be as much careful as possible in order to keep words like that away from my space. As you saw, I based what I wrote on a few books, that is, I didn't get what you read out of nothing. If this source of mine has a lack of knowledge, please, show me a better one and I promise that I'll give it a good read so that I can rid of these "wrong ideas".

      -> "1. First Thing: European Portuguese is not a dialetc. I could elaborate on this, but it would be lengthy..."

      Thanks for letting us know. I understand that, as a teacher, you must be very sensitive about such terms. However, despite of appreciating your statement, I think that it won't take us anywhere. It's hard to find someone who's really interested in details like that.

      -> "2. The BP nad EP accents, as you call them, are not completely different. There are differences, of course, but using "completely" here is a bit too much..."

      Everyone calls them like that... Ok, ok. Not completely! They're just 90% different from each other. My intention was never to put a spin on this matter. :)

      -> "3. When you say EP sounds more like Spanish or French, you're just showing a total lack of knowledge of YOUR own language."

      This is not my language, dear. If these languages were the same, no one would be so unsure about which one they should learn.

      -> "4. Do we, in Portugal, "extend" the "s"?! We do, sometimes, depending on the location of the letter in the word, and also on national language variations. It is not a general rule."

      -> "5. The "r" made with the throat?! See above comment. Don't some Brazilians do the same, by the way? They do. I have heard it."

      It was just my impression. What's the big deal? Take it as a compliment. I think this is really fancy! :)

      -> "6. We do not have a hard time understanding each other. I have no clue where you got that idea from."

      As I told Constança, maybe you don't, but we do. Most of us at least.

      -> "7. Some words and expressions apart, because yes, there are indeed differences, we perfectly understand BP. We do not need subtitles at all! Again, you need to know YOUR own language better, because WE understand YOU very well."

      I do understand MY language. :)

      -> "8. Now the "bicha" issue. Well, we, in Portugal, say either bicha or fila for "line". However, we tend to avoid "bicha" precisely because of its double meaning. Here, too, bicha is slang for gay. "

      I didn't know that. Thanks for letting me know!

      -> "9. I would never as a Portuguese from Portugal say "tomar uma pica no rabo". Ever. I doubt any Portuguese would. Again, where did you get that idea from?! First, the word "pica" in this context is the kind of vocabulary we use to talk to small children. We would say "pica" instead of "vacina" just because it is a simpler word. However, we would not use the verb "tomar" neither with "pica", nor with "vacina", but "levar" instead. I would say the average normal Portuguese would then say "levar uma vacina" and would not even specify where..."

      Another curiosity! Thanks again! [...]

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    2. -> "You are also probably wrong when you say that there are more differences between the BP and the EP than between the AE nad the BE. I use the word probably here because I never conducted research on this, so I cannot really be 100% sure. I don't usually make statement based on nothing..."

      I've never made anything based on nothing. Just do a search and you'll see that. Besides, have you ever seen how British and American people interact with each other? It's really far from how we do. When they're talking bout accents and all, they don't take it so seriously. Most of them actually have fun with the differences, which is something that I've never seen over here. Brazilians and the Portuguese people almost (if not always) end up with a fight when it comes to accents. Who cares?! I don't. After all, "every country has its own characteristics. That's what makes them unique, right?"

      -> "What language is it that you speak then, if you think we, in Portugal, and you, in Brazil, do not speak the same language anymore?!"

      In the same way Portuguese came from Latin, The BP came from the EP. If the differences are that huge right now, I doubt that the BP will not be considered as a different language in the future.

      -> "Don't get me wrong. I have nothing against you. I just think people need to know what they are talking about, and you do not. That is for sure!"

      All right, all opinions are accepted. It's a shame that you think like that. Everyone has its own truth, and we have to learn how to live with and respect all of them. After all, we can't please everybody, can we?

      Thanks for you time! :)

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  3. Propina é imposto em Portugal? Quem disse isso é impostor. Camisinha é Durex? Wrong again. Camisinha é preservativo. Grupo de crianças, canalhas? Mais um tiro no pé. Vacina são picas? Errado. Picas é uma forma de expressão usada para as crianças apenas, para infantilizar o termo injecção. Homosexual não é paneleiro. Homosexual é homosexual. Paneleiro é viado, bicha. Mestruada é ESTAR COM HISTÓRIAS? LMAO! Um dentista e um estomatologista são profissionais da mesma área, mas com especialidades diferentes: o estomatologista não cuida apenas da boca, cuida também das estruturas como a pele. O estomatologista está apto a diagnosticar lesões dentro e fora da cavidade bucal, podendo tratá-las. Não é só dentes. É também quem trata dos lábios, dentes, mucosa oral, glândulas salivares, tonsilas palatinas e faringeas e demais estruturas da orofaringe. Não há explicadores. Há professores que dão explicações. Um salva-vidas de praia não é um banheiro. É um nadador-salvador. Um sanitário NÃO é um Salva-vidas. Enfrascar-se é slang para embebedar-se. Assim como apanhar um pifo, beber uns copos, apanhar uma cadela, mamar umas jolas, chupar, pilhar, mamar, apanhar uma buba, tudo formas de slang. Assino por baixo que devemos respeitar as diferenças, mas também devemos respeitar a gramática. E já agora… porquê que no Brasil se diz iGUInorante? Estranho não?

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    1. Agradeço pelo esclarecimento. Apesar de os termos que foram citados por você serem diferentes dos do livro que me baseei, ainda assim são, em sua grande maioria, muito diferentes dos que utilizamos por aqui. Mais uma vez, obrigado pelo feedback. Tenho certeza de que será de bom proveito para muitos. :)

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  4. Em Portugal diz-se tanto "fila" como "bicha". E "bicha" também pode significar gay.
    "Portugal: tomar uma pica no rabo": ninguém diz isto. Só as crianças dizem pica. E não é "tomar", é "levar". Qualquer português com mais de 10 anos diz "levar uma injecção no rabo".
    Imposto é imposto. Propinas são os pagamentos feitos pelos estudantes às universidades públicas. Tax = imposto. Tuiton = propina.

    A tabela tem tantos erros que me arrepiei.
    "Durex" é uma marca de preservativos (condom). Ninguém diz "vou comprar "durexs". Ninguém lhes chama durex.
    "Bica" é um café expresso no sul do país. Na região do Porto diz-se "cimbalino".
    "Paneleiro" é calão. Correctamente e usual é homossexual.
    Canalhas não são grupos de crianças. "Canalha" é uma ofensa.
    Um adolescente é um adolescente. "Puto" é calão para criança/adolescente/pessoa mais nova.
    Peruca é peruca. Capachinho são perucas de homem, que só cobrem o topo da cabeça.
    Dentista é dentista. Estomatologista é mais formal.
    "banheiro" não existe sequer. Se a expressão "salva-vidas de praia" se refere a "baywatch", em Portugal diz-se "nadador-salvador".
    Se sanitário se refere a uma sanita, é uma sanita. Nem sei porque alguém iria chamar "salva-vidas". Absurdo.
    Cego também é cego. Invisual é mas formal.
    Embebedar-se é embebedar-se. "Enfrascar-se" é calão.
    Mulherengo e marialva significam o mesmo cá, e são ambos termos muito utilizados.
    Tesão em Portugal é "boner". Ponta só se for de cigarro.
    Existe um prato em Portugal que se chama "punheta de bacalhau". Mas punheta é sem dúvida o termo mais utilizado para descrever a masturbação masculina.

    Se não sabes, não inventes!

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    1. Olá, Catarina!

      Agradeço pelos esclarecimentos. Com certeza ajudarão não só à mim como aos estrangeiros que possuem interesse em sua língua também. O comentário inteiro foi bem explicativo e de fácil compreensão. Entretanto, o que me chamou a atenção foi a sua última frase:

      "Se não sabes, não inventes!"

      Você fala como se EU fosse a pessoa que escreveu esse livro. Por um caso meu nome é Max Gehringer ? Eu acho que não. Eu não inventei absolutamente nada. Tudo o que escrevi, escrevi com base em algo. Se esse autor e os outros escreveram algo que não é do agrado de vocês, saiba que isso é novidade para mim. Nunca pensei que se sentiriam tão ofendidos! Ajudar a esclarecer os fatos é uma coisa. Agora, agir na defensiva como se eu tivesse lançado mil ofensas é outra. Triste...

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  5. Some remarks...Portuguese from Lisbon here.
    You forgot that in Brazil the gerund verbal form is almost obsessively used, while in Portugal it is practically non-existent. ex "eu estou falando" vs "eu estou a falar"
    This list of vocabulary needs a serious revision. It's like someone decided to write a brazilian regular speech/portuguese old timey slang dictionary.
    Pica is a silly, childish way of referring to a vaccine. And no one says "tomar uma pica". It would be "levar uma pica". Or if you're not a child, "tomar uma vacina".
    Cueca works for both men and women. It is a generic term for an article of clothing. However it is very rarely said like that, cuecas is most common. It's like saying calça instead of calças - plain weird.
    Taxes are impostos. A propina is a type of fee, like for example, university tuition is called propinas universitárias. A bribery is a suborno, or in slang, luvas.
    Durex is a brand of condoms. Condoms are called preservativos. Camisinha is also catching on though. It sounds kinda cute.
    Homossexual is....homossexual. Don't say someone is a paneleiro, it is an insult.
    I've never heard of canalhas being a group of children, although I've seen groups of children which were without a doubt a bunch of canalhas. It sounds like a very old meaning.
    Puto is someone young or immature. A 1 year old is a puto. So is a 17 year old. Also, the female form is pita, not puta.
    Both capachinho and peruca are used. Cabeleira is also common.
    There are countless euphemisms for menstruation, but I've never heard of "estar com histórias". It definitely sounds like slang. You can say "estou com a menstruação" or "estou com o período" (more common) instead.
    Estomatologia is the branch of medicine that occupies itself with oral health. No one says "hoje vou ao estomatologista". It's a freaking gigantic word! Dentista is used all the time.
    A life guard (at the beach, or at a pool) is a salva-vidas. Banheiro sounds weird. And now I'm extremely confused about what sanitário actually means in Brazil....
    An invisual is a politically correct cego.
    People go out and....embebedam-se! Enfrascar-se is slang for embebedar-se.
    Mulherengo is perfectly fine to describe a womanizer. A marialva implies a specific brand of old school machismo - womanizing, woman beating, lover of wine and into bullfighting, and curiously, deeply religious.
    No one says "está lá?" when they answer the phone. It is either "Estou?" or more commonly "tou?" (we really like chopping of the "es" from the verb "estar".
    And finally, for the love of God and all that is holy, stop with the ora pois. NO ONE SAYS THAT :P
    Apart from that, I agree with you wholeheartedly on the orthographic agreement. Both versions of the language have drifted apart and there is no problem with that. It is this forced unification that is both pointless and impossible. An agreement that supposedly unifies and simplifies, only adds numerous ambiguities and exceptions. The majority of academics in Portugal are against it. It was passed into law by the politicians, ignoring the people who have studied the language for decades. My contempt for the political class in Portugal could not be greater. In their desire to feel a bit bigger by getting closer to the economic powerhouse that is Brazil, they've butchered our language.
    I can't use google translate for anything. It is tuned only for brazilian portuguese, and there is no way to change it. We shouldn't be excluded from those types of services just because we are barely 11 million and you guys are over 200 million. There are only 4 million norwegians and no one dreams of offering any internet services to them in swedish, even though the differences between norwegian and swedish are as much or even less than between PT-BR and PT-PT.
    I guess the key difference is that the norwegians have money. And aren't ruled by rats.

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    1. Hey!

      Thanks for your help! The word "sanitários" means bathroom/toilet. You'll probably find big sings with this word at the airports, stations and terminals. There are also a few branches like vaso sanitário (toilet sit), agente sanitário (sanitary agent), etc. We also like to remove the "es" from the words. :)

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  6. Em Portugal os filmes e novelas não levam legendas porque os portugueses percebem perfeitamente o sotaque brasileiro apesar das palavras diferentes e da construção das frases não ser igual.
    Os brasileiros abrem todas as vogais enquanto os portugueses não.
    Acontece amiúde os brasileiros falarem outro idioma para não serem identificados mas sem grande sucesso. Sou Comissário de bordo e aparecem-me muitos nos aviões.
    Ainda gostava que me explicassem qual a razão de grande parte dizer " GRACIAS " em vez de " OBRIGADO ". Já aconteceu lembrar-lhes que falamos o mesmo idioma mas não compreendem o que quero dizer. Há tempos uma senhora não percebeu quando lhe disse " só em situações pontuais ". Foi necessário esclarecê-la que significa " só em situações excepcionais ". Também não sabem o que é uma chávena quando nós sabemos perfeitamente o que é uma chícara ou xícara. Pode escrever-se de ambas as maneiras mas a segunda é mais utilizada.
    Enquanto nós compreendemos muito bem um brasileiro o oposto não acontece e, frequentemente, temos de explicar o que queremos dizer mas devagar.
    Estes são alguns exemplos mas muitos mais haverá.

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    1. Olá, José!

      Não sei quanto aos brasileiros que você conheceu, mas tenho certeza de que me comunicaria em outro idioma sem problema algum. E não, não faria isso para passar despercebido. Simplesmente pelo fato de que detesto discussões sem sentido. Por que é que há essa guerra tão irritante em relação aos sotaques? Cada um no seu quadrado, hora. Se um não consegue aceitar o outro apenas por essa razão, não vejo o motivo pelo qual iria me arriscar. Afinal, nunca se sabe com que tipo de pessoa você está falando, não é? Um idioma alternativo seria, sem dúvida alguma, a melhor opção - pelo menos para mim. Em relação ao uso do termo hispânico, devo-lhe dizer que fiquei impressionado. Nunca vi ninguém agradecer dessa forma. Bom saber! E sim, infelizmente o que você disse à respeito de vocês nos entenderem mas nós termos uma certa dificuldade em relação à vocês é verdade. Talvez pelo fato de que foi através da sua língua que a nossa se originou? Não sei, mas espero que com o tempo isso possa se resolver.

      Agradeço pelo seu tempo e pela sua participação! :)

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  7. Foi exactamente o que eu pensei. O meu comentário não iria ser publicado. Afinal, esclarecer não é o propósito deste blogue. Fica lá com a pica no rabo e sê feliz.

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    1. Minha intenção não é e nunca foi privar ninguém de esclarecimento algum. Afinal, considero este local como uma fonte de conhecimentos fornecidos por mim e por todos aqueles que desejem contribuir com alguma coisa. Há um ditado popular que diz: "quem é apressado come cru e quente". Não sou obrigado a dar satisfações à ninguém e nem a aceitar comentários ofensivos. Na verdade, quando leio a primeira frase e vejo que é algo desse gênero, nem termino de ler. Já recuso de cara! Entretanto, já que faz tanta questão de saber o motivo pelo qual demorei para publicar o seu, aqui está a sua tão desejada resposta! Conhece um termo chamado viagem de negócios? Pois é! Também tenho que cuidar da minha vida, sabia disso? Lá uma vez ou outra demoro no máximo uma semana para ler e responder as mensagens que recebi. Infelizmente (para você) foi o que aconteceu nesse caso. Como disse acima, aprecio a ajuda, mas devo deixar bem claro que não tolero ignorância.

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